Bau: Happy Birthday

 

Happy Birthday

Today, I am celebrating my 5th birthday which, according to a chart put out by the American Veterinary Medical Association, I am 36!

Dogs age nine human years between ages 1 and 2
A lot of development is still happening in a dog’s second year of life.
By the end of the second year, medium-sized dogs have developed by about nine years, and are 24 in human years, the AVMA says.
After year 2, dogs age about 4 to 6 human years per year
Here’s where you can toss out the seven-year rule, and where things really start to vary. The chart from the AVMA shows dogs aging about four to six years each year after year 2. Between ages 3 and 5, for example, they age by four years each year.
Between age 5 and 6, they age by six years. Then, between ages 6 and 7, they age by five years. Between ages 7 and 8, it goes back down to four years.

In Simplemost by Brittany Anas:

 

Bau: A New Friend

One of my favorite activities is lying in bed in the morning although mistress doesn’t consider it an activity. Anyway, I’m only just half napping.

I love, love, love it when she gets up in the morning and then returns to bed with a cup of tea and her iPad while she snuggles her feet near me. I could stay like this all day!

But then she spoils it by saying time to  get to work and although, at first, I’m not too enthusiastic about leaving the bed, it ends up being a great day.

 

shriners 3

Photo taken with permission from The Shriners Hospital in Montreal 

Thursday Book Feature: Mourning Has Broken

Thank you, Abbie, for your review of my memoir Mourning Has Broken. I so very much appreciate it. For more on Abbie just click on her links below. 🙂

My Corner

Image contains: Abbie, smiling.

Mourning Has Broken

By C. A. Balawyder

Copyright 2013.

The loss of her parents and sister inspired author and blogger Carol Balawyder to write the essays in this collection. She writes about her relationship with the loved ones she lost. Other pieces focus on such topics as travel, online dating, religion, and, of course, mourning.

Having lost my parents, grandparents, and husband, I can identify with the feelings the author expresses, especially the guilt at not having done more for her loved ones before they passed. If you are grieving and have similar feelings, this book should help you understand you’re not alone. If you’re suffering from a recent loss, be sure you have plenty of Kleenex handy when you read it.

My Books

My Ideal Partner: How I Met, Married, and Cared for the Man I Loved Despite Debilitating Odds

That’s Life: New and Selected Poems

How to Build…

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Blogger Bouquet #56

I must be going through a lucky streak for Jenhttps://jenniferkellandperry.com/nifer Kelland Perry just presented me with a beautiful blogger bouquet and some very kind words about my blog. Thank you so very much, Jenifer. ❤
Please visit Jennifer’s blog and her books on Young Adult fiction.

Carol Balawyder is an author, blogger and dog owner that I’ve only recently started following.

From her Welcome page:

“Welcome to my website and blog. I write about justice, mid-life dating, grief, blogs that inspire me both as a writer and a person, awesome writing workshops and my dog, Bau.

I have series on: How I Got Published, The Femme Fatale, Nobel Prize Laureates, Writers’ Desks, Ten Great First Dates.

One of my goals is to make online friends with bloggers around the world of different and alike views.”

Carol’s dog Bau has now been made the mascot for the Reading Program at Carol’s library. Check out this cute dog with a job in the post below:

Bau: Benefits of Reading To a Dog

Comments are closed here but you can leave a little love on the blogger’s page.

Have a beautiful weekend, everyone!

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Mourning Has Broken

I just received a nice surprise. Kevin Cooper posted a review of my memoir Mourning Has Broken on his blog. Many, Many Thanks, Kevin. ❤

Author Kevin Cooper

Mourning Has Broken offers a moving and poignant look at grief and loss. In this collection of narrative non-fiction essays, the author speaks from the heart not only about the death of a dear sister but also about the mourning of a mother, a father, a dear friend, a career and a religion.
Her sister’s death tore her heart apart. The grief she felt for her was more intense than any grief she ever felt for the death of someone dear to her. Perhaps it was the amalgamation of un-mourned griefs, or maybe it was because it was closer to home . To lose a parent puts your mortality next in line; to lose a sister, you are no longer in line – you have crossed the threshold.

When her mother died she wrote Don’t Bring me Flowers, an essay which is in this collection. In the weeks which followed…

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Bau: Benefits of Reading To a Dog

Well, here I am on a poster. It was bound to happen with all my charisma. I am pleased and honored to announce that the library has made me their mascot for their Reading Program.

Library Poster

“Dogs trained to work in hospitals, nursing homes, disaster areas, and the like, their purpose to bring comfort and cheer in hopes of lightening whatever suffering humans might be going through. …(t)hey are often used to help children with emotional or learning difficulties. To improve speech and literacy skills, children in schools and libraries are being encouraged to read aloud to dogs. Excellent results have been reported, with children who read to dogs said to progress significantly better than children who read to other humans…

…If, as studies show, a dog’s nose is capable of detecting cancer, it would not be surprising if it could also detect changes caused by the relief of stress, or by the experience of mental stimulation or pleasure.”

In: The Friend by Sigrid Nunez.

I love being read to. Sometimes I fall asleep but most times I’m pretty alert. I find it rather pleasant and calming. I like it because I get to listen to stories. Most of them are about dogs, which is very considerate.