Two Romances

I recently read two very different romance novels in which the authors couldn’t be further apart.  Sisters and Rivals was written by an Australian writer while Second Chance Romance was written by an American Southern writer.

Second Chance Romance is Jill Weatherholt’s debut novel while Sisters and Rivals  is one of thirty or so books published by Margaret Lynette Sharp.

Yet, they have in common their ability to create characters which draw you in, whether they are sweet and kind or selfish and sneaky.

Sisters and Rivals by [Sharp, Margaret Lynette]

It’s the mid nineteen fifties, and the nascent romance of two young Sydneysiders is about to be challenged. The heroine, Linda, is being courted by an ambitious young carpenter named Harry. Seemingly without effort, he passes the scrutiny of her parents and they encourage her alliance with him.

Trouble brews, though, when her sister Tessa lays eyes on him and, despite her engagement to a young accountant, makes her feelings abundantly clear. Will Tessa’s overtures ruin the fledgling love between Harry and Linda?

My Take

Ah, to be young and in love and having to face the heartbreak of betrayal. Anyone who has experienced betrayal will surely find comfort in reading this book.

The setting takes place in fifties Australia but it could easily have been in Canada or the US for its accent on the values and day to day universal details of an era absent of internet or cellphones and sex was well…perhaps more chaste then.

I found the book to be suspenseful enough to keep me reading and found the fifties era to be wonderfully portrayed.

Visit Margaret’s author page here.

 

 

Second Chance Romance

Jackson Daughtry’s jobs as a paramedic and part-owner of a local café keep him busy—but the single dad’s number one priority is raising his little girl with love and small-town values. And when his business partner’s hotshot lawyer niece comes to town planning to disrupt their lives by moving her aunt away, Jackson has to set Melanie Harper straight. When circumstances force them to work side by side in the coffee shop, Jackson slowly discovers what put the sadness in Melanie’s pretty brown eyes. Now it’ll take all his faith—and a hopeful five-year-old—to show the city gal that she’s already home.

 

My Take

Second Chance Romance is one of these feel good books which gives us hope in the goodness of humankind.  An inspiring book for anyone embarking on a relationship with someone who has small children. The relationship between the adorable five year old and her father’s girlfriend is worth paying attention to. 

It was refreshing to read a book where the characters are sweet, honest, good people. Also refreshing that they were middle-aged.

The book warmed my heart with its tenderness and honest abiding characters and its warm and friendly rural setting. 

Definitely a pick me up book.

Visit Jill’s author page here.

 

 

The Longest Nine Months Update

 Dear Fellow Bloggers,

This is simply to let you know that some updates have been made on The Longest Nine Months and, if it hasn’t already been updated for you, you can download the update through your “Manage Your Content and Devices” page.

To receive updates to your eBooks automatically:

  1. Turn on the Annotations Backup* for your Kindle device or Kindle reading app. This will sync your notes, highlights, eBookmarks, and furthest page read

  2. Go to the Manage Your Content and Devices page

  3. Select “Automatic Book Update” under the Settings tab

  4. Select “On” from the dropdown menu

Thanks for reading my work.

 

the longest nine months 2

 

https://www.amazon.com/-/e/B00QYYX008

FREE BOOK PROMOTION

This coming weekend is Thanksgiving in Canada.

There is lots that I am thankful for. The list is long and includes you, dear online friends.

Thanks for your inspiring posts, your amazing photos and art work. Your wisdom, your spirit and your support. Thanks for sharing part of your life with me. 🙂

 

The Longest Nine Months.jpg oct. 2017

 

 

https://www.amazon.com/-/e/B00QYYX008

If you’re downloading to an IPad You cannot purchase content through the Kindle app due to Apple Store restrictions; you’ll need to use Amazon’s website instead and scroll down to Part 3: Purchasing New Kindle Content on Your iPad. keep reading.  

This promotion is good from October 6, 2017 to October 10, 2017. Don’t miss this free book offer!

I’d love your thoughts on it!

Thanks

 

 

 

 

Using a Pen Name

Do you write under a pen name? And if so, why?

An article in Writer’s Relief  lists reasons why writers choose to adopt pen names. It could be, as they point out, that another author “owns” your name. For example, it would be difficult for someone named Agatha Christie to write under her real name.

Or, as a high school teacher who writes erotica, you’d want to conceal your identity. I hope.

Or maybe, you write in a genre that has basically a male audience and you are a woman. Joanne Rowling used the initials J.K. (K after her grandmother Katherine) because she feared that boys would not want to read Harry Potter if it was written by (horror!) a girl.  Similarly, Mary Ann Evans used a male name because she wanted to be taken seriously and wrote under the name of George Eliot. Of course, that was in the 1860’s and that doesn’t happen anymore, right?

Should you be interested in using a pen name you might want to consult Ellen Sedwick’s Self-Publishers Legal handbook for the legal aspects on using a pen name .

Here are some well known pen names:

Amanda Cross: Carolyn Gold Heilbrun

Isak Dinesen: Karen Christenze von Blixen-Finecke

Ann Rice: Howard Allen Frances O’Brien

John le Carré: David Cornwell

And pen names that hide more famous real names:

Rosamond Smith: Joyce Carol Oates

Richard Backman: Stephen King

And there are authors who write under several pen names.

 

Kathryne layne               A Hint of Scandle 2

 

 

 

 

 

upon-your-love-final-cover    Heather Crouse

Click to read an excerpt from Marie Lavender’s latest book.

What are your thoughts on a pen name for yourself?

 

 

 

Back in the Groove

Two things have been happening since my last blog post eons ago.

Number 1

I moved.

Moving is much like doing a major spring cleaning of every room in your house. Every nook and cranny and every spec of dust. In a way, it was very liberating and made me practice minimalism. It struck me as incredible and depressing to see how much stuff I’d accumulated throughout the years.

I moved into a smaller apartment and so I needed to downsize and trim my possessions. I still haven’t been able to let go of a small beige colored handbag which I haven’t used in years but it used to belong to my mother. What am I holding unto?

And then there was the move itself during Montreal’s heaviest snowstorm of the season!

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Source

Oops! Sorry, wrong photo!

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Source

My poor dog, Bau, didn’t at all like the move.

Wake me when it’s over!

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OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Number 2

The second reason why I haven’t been posting on my blog is that I had nothing to say.

Then, I received an e-mail from Thelma Mariano, the editor of my women’s fiction novels:

New Picture (9)  balawydermissisdatingadventures  cafe paradise a  Not by Design

Thelma was recently interviewed by Duke Diercks where, along with 12 other editors, was asked this question:

What is the #1 mistake that you see first-time authors make?

 Here’s part of her answer:

 Most first-time novelists underestimate the amount of work required to bring their completed draft to a publishable level. This leads to what I believe is the #1 problem with early manuscripts: a lack of story tension.

If we lack a “story-worthy” problem, something strong enough to pull a reader through hundreds of pages, needing to know what happens next, no amount of editing will make it better.

Click here to read more on Thelma’s answer

and here on the editing process

More Indie Books I’ve Read

 

Here are two more books by fellow bloggers that you might enjoy reading.

 

Get  your copy of P.S. I Forgive You today!

 

Like all of D.G. Kaye’s books, I was eager to read her latest – a follow up to Conflicted Heart.  P.S. I Forgive You – A Broken Legacy  is Kaye’s most heart wrenching and intense book to date. Not surprising, considering the subject of this memoir.  It is D.G. Kaye’s and her siblings’ attempt of freeing themselves from the clutches of emotional neglect.

P.S. I Forgive You – A Broken Legacy is a testimony to the painful effects of her mother’s gambling addiction on her and her siblings. Anyone who has lived with an addict knows how destructive it can be, how much it creates guilt, resentment and a feeling of low self esteem.

P.S. I Forgive You  is heartbreaking to read but D.G. Kaye’s strength and ability to offer an honest examination of her experience is an inspiration to anyone who has found themselves with the difficult decision of turning away from a toxic relationship. Most importantly, in Kaye’s difficult journey to self love and acceptance she offers hope in her struggle to love a mother who was not able to provide the same for her children.

A tender, well written book.

Visit D.G.Kaye’s blog here: http://dgkayewriter.com/

 

 

Glass Slippers and Stilettos is a collection of ten short stories as seen through the eyes of Linden’s protagonist, Regina. In the story titled Driving Regina, whereby Regina is involved in an accident, Ana Linden writes: Little does he (the driver of the car Regina has run into) know that Regina has such emergencies once a week. This pretty well sums up Regina, along with this other line:  Men lovers are  her recreational drug.

Linden’s characters don’t have names. Instead she refers to them as Boyfriend, Lover, The Assistant, Kid, Mr. Impeccable Pedigree, and Inconsiderate. Using this technique is clever as it allows the reader to identify easily with the characters. Haven’t we all met such people in our own lives?

In some ways, Regina is a contemporary femme fatale (minus the crime) for she possesses traits often found in this archetype of literature: gold digger, selfish, heartless, manipulative, opportunist, sense of entitlement both with her friends, lovers and at work and an accomplished liar.

Although it is difficult to like Regina it is also difficult to put her down.

You can read excerpts from Glass Slippers and Stilettos here.