Bau: A Visit With Alzheimer Patients

Look at me with two of my favorite people.

We go visit just when it’s snack time and they both are so kind to give me their cookies in spite of my mistress telling them not to.

She explains that it’s not good for me but they ignore her. Good for them!

Bau and patients

Thank you for the cookies. I love  you!

The equivalent to Alzheimer’s disease in dogs is called Canine Cognitive Dysfunction Syndrome (CDS).  One thing I know for certain is that if ever I end up in a home because of Canine Cognitive Dysfunction I will always give part of my cookies to the dogs that visit me.

Physical and behavioural changes are similar in both Alzheimer’s and CDS. So similar, we can borrow from the extensive research that has been done in humans and lab animals to help understand what will delay the onset of senile dementia in pets. (5) Conversely, dogs are also increasingly being used as models to study the disease in humans. (11, 12, 13)

http://www.animalresearch.info/en/medical-advances/veterinary-medicine/cognitive-dysfunction-syndrome-cds/

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bau: Passing With Flying Colors

As expected, I passed my evaluation to become a therapy dog with flying colors. There were lots of dogs present, most much bigger than me. One even barked at me which I totally ignored although I did find that he was awfully rude and I secretly wished that he would fail the test.
I have to admit that the whole thing was a bit intimidating and since I had never done this before and didn’t know what to expect I stayed near my mistress and obeyed her. During one of the tests, all the dogs were required to pass by an enormous tray of cookies to see if any of us would steal one. It was tempting but with my super will power I didn’t even attempt a sniff. The big dog who barked at me pounced on the cookie tray and they went flying all over the place and he  was immediately disqualified.
You can imagine how satisfying that was for me!

Caring Paws 2

Now What?

Bau: Getting A Job

I love my outside environment but inside – not counting the food available there – it’s rather depressing. I’m still missing that long hallway of my old house.

“Hey, Lazy Bones, I found you a job,” Mistress says, her tone of voice all enthusiastic and joyful as she looks down at me.

Of course, I have no idea what a job entails but still I wag my tail because of her enthusiasm and that I’m happy to see her.

She then tells me that she booked an evaluation for me. “Come on let’s go.”

Now? You want me to go now. I’m really not feeling up to it I want to tell her. Can’t she read body language. Besides, I’m still feeling somewhat depressed because of the move.

now

dog contemplating having a job 

 

 

Bau: Focusing on the World Outside

Sometimes (too often) I am left alone. My favorite activity when this happens is to get comfortable and stare out at life outside. I can do this for hours. I am very good at focusing. Better than most humans, I would say. I just wish that she would move that basket of flowers. It blurs my vision.

Although the dog’s visual acuity is considerably less than that of a normal human, a lot of information  is still getting from his eyes to his brain, even though the focus is “soft” and he won’t be able to make out many details. The overall effect is something like viewing the world through a fine mesh gauze or a piece of cellophane that has been smeared with a light coat of petroleum jelly. The overall outlines of objects are visible, but a lot of the internal details will be blurred and might even be lost. (p. 25)

In How Dogs Think by Stanley Coren.

Bau thinking

dog contemplating life

 

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