Blogger Recognition Award

 

Blogger recognition award

Award Plaque by Sally Cronin

Thank you to D.G. Kaye at dgkayewriter  for nominating me for the Blogger Recognition Award.

With each award there are rules of courtesy to follow. Here are the rules:

Rules:

1. Thank the blogger(s) who nominated you and provide a link to their blog.
2. Write a post to show your award.
3. Give a brief story of how your blog started.
4. Give two pieces of advice to new bloggers.
5. Select up to fifteen bloggers you want to give this award to.
6. Comment (or pingback) on each blog to let them know that you’ve nominated them and provide a link to the post you’ve created.

How my blog got started

This was one of my first posts on a blog I named A Girl Called Brenda.

Posted on July 24, 2010

Writer: A Profession Like No Other

Brenda had just completed all the revisions on her novel. She’d been working steadily on it for three and a half years and now it was finished. She had sent her synopsis to a publishing house and the editor now asked to see her manuscript. She felt elated.
The next morning her sister called. “I’m having a bar-b-q for the family,” she said. “Do you want to come?”
“Guess what?” Brenda said, “I’ve finished my novel.”

“That’s nice,” her sister said. “What do you want to bring?”
“I’ve got a publisher and I’m sending it this morning to the editor.”
“Bring potato salad. Our mother’s recipe.”
At the bar-b-q Brenda placed her potato salad on the table and took off the plastic wrap over it. Her aunt who was standing next to her said, “How have you been, dear?’
“I’ve just sent out a manuscript to a publisher.”
“It’s nice to have a hobby,” her aunt said. “Your potato salad looks good. Is that your mother’s recipe?”
Then a cousin whom she hadn’t seen in a long time spotted her. “Hey,” he said, “How it do, Brendy? Long time no see.”
There were reasons for that, Brenda thought but was keeping them to herself. No sense ruining her sister’s bar-b-q. “Yeah, well, I’ve been busy writing my crime novel. I sent it out yesterday.”
“No shit, Sherlock. I always thought I could write a novel. Can’t be too difficult. I’ve got a few crazy tales up here myself,” he said pointing to his head.
“I bet,” Brenda said. “Excuse me,” she told her cousin, “I have to talk to grandma.”
“I heard you say that you finished your manuscript,” her grandmother told her.
At last, someone in her family was taking an interest in her writing.
“I did, grandma,” Brenda said glowing. “Three and a half years and I finally sent it out.”
“Oh my, how many pages is it?” her grandmother asked her.
“Five hundred and thirty,” Brenda said. “Double spaced.”
Her grandmother’s face lit up. “Do you have any ruined sheets?”
“What do you mean?”
“I just thought that maybe if you had any extra pages that didn’t come out you can give them to me to line my budgie’s cage. Newspaper is so messy.”

It was also on this blog that I posted my Ten Great First Dates series which I eventually migrated to my current blog and shut down A Girl Called Brenda.

Two pieces of advice for new bloggers:

  1. Check out all the WordPress Tutorials for beginners on YouTube. There’s lots of easy to follow advice.
  2.  Remember that you are not the only one who bloggers are reading so be efficient. Avoid Anna Karenina length posts on your blog. Short and sweet is better than seemingly endless.

I’ve chosen to nominate some new bloggers I’ve discovered whose blogs are inspiring, positive and beautiful.

Lost in Nowhere  

Pups&Prose

Site Title: Pictures

Show Pictures  

Ideal Inspiration

Aria-Bela Rises  

Debby

Source: http://www.flickr.com/photos/signote/

 

 

 

Nobel Prize Laureate: Olga Tokarczuk

 

olga-tokarczuk-WikiWikipedia

Olga Tokarczuk is the recipient of the 2018-2019 Nobel Prize for Literature. Although this prize is awarded to Olga Tokarczuk in 2019, she is actually the 2018 nomination. The prize was held over because of sexual abuse and financial scandals which led to a series of resignations in the Swedish Academy.  She is the fifteenth and second Polish writer to win this prestigious prize.

Flights

 

Ms. Tokarczuk is no stranger to receiving prizes for her literary works. In 2008 her novel Flights won the Nike award, Poland’s top literary award. In 2018 Flights took the Man Booker Prize for its translation into English by Jennifer Croft. 

Tokarczuk’s work focuses on peace, democracy and activism. In an interview with Claire Armitstead in The Guardian, Tokarczuk had this to say about a two-year book deal on detective stories:

But just writing a book to know who is the killer is wasting paper and time, so I decided to put into it animal rights and a story of dissenting citizens who realise that the law is immoral and see how far can they can go with saying no to it.”

In a fascinating interview with Adam Smith – Chief Scientific Officer of Nobel Media – Olga Tokarczuk speaks of the 2018 Nobel Prize in Literature as a symbol of hope for those worried about the ‘Crisis in democracy’ she sees facing central Europe.

For more on Female Nobel Laureates for Literature please visit my series. 

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Nobel Prize Laureate: Svetlana Alexievich

Svetlana Alexievich wins the 2015 Nobel Prize in Literature.

An investigative journalist from Belarus, Alexievich is the 14th woman to win this prestigious prize and the first female Russian writer to do so.

What is unusual about her winning the prize for literature is that her writing is non-fiction.

Svetlana Alexievich

Source 

Literature is just a fancy word for writing says Philip Gourevitch in his The NewYorker article titled Non Fiction Deserves a Nobel.

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Nobel Prize Laureates: Who is Next?

Fourteen women have so far won the Nobel Prize for Literature. They are:

1909: Selma Lagertof (Sweden)

1926: Grazia Deledda (Italy)

1928: Sigrid Undset (Denmark)

1938: Pearl. S. Buck (USA)

1945: Gabriela Mistral (Chile)

1966: Nelly Suchs (Germany)

1991: Nadine Gordimer (South Africa)

1993: Toni Morrison (USA)

1996: Wistawa Szymborska (Poland)

2004: Elfriede Jelinek (Austria)

2007: Doris Lessing (Iran)

2009: Herta Muller (Romania)

2013: Alice Munro (Canada)

2015: Svetlana Alexievich (Belarus)

To know more about these Nobel Laureates click here .

Photo source

In his will, Alfred Nobel stated that his entire remaining estate should be used to endow “prizes to those who, during the previous year, shall have conferred the greatest benefit to mankind.”

In light of this, my choice for the next Female Nobel Prize for Literature is Taslima Nasrin, a writer from Bangladesh.

Photo Source

 Her novel Lajja (1993) is  a protest against torture, religious extremism and terrorism by Muslim fundamentalists.

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Nobel Prize Laureate: Selma Lagerlöf

The Swedish writer Selma Lagerlöf was the first female writer to win the Nobel Prize in Literature (1909).

The SwedishAcademy awarded her the prize in appreciation of the lofty idealism, her vivid imagination and spiritual perception that characterize her writings.

Lagerlöf is most widely known for her children’s book The Wonderful Adventures of Nils.

The book, intended as a geography primer for elementary schools, became a classic in children’s literature and was translated in several languages.  You can click here for a comprehensive description of The Wonderful Adventures of Nils, written by  Elysa Faith Ng,  an eleven year old child.

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Nobel Prize Laureate: Toni Morrison

 Toni Morrison’s first novel,The Bluest Eye was her effort to depict racial self-loathing and to question the standards of beauty in America.

In an afterword of the 1999 edition of The Bluest Eye Morrison states that “…even the casual racial contempt can cause devastation.”

 Award winning editor and writer Dorothy Allison wrote of  Morrison’s talent in handling the narrator, Claudia, of The Bluest Eye:

“It was the storyteller, Claudia, who looked at the world with unflinching honesty, the beauty, and the ugliness alike. I understood her the way she raked her own soul, holding herself responsible for sins she should  never have thought hers.”

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Nobel Prize Laureate: Nelly Sachs

In the unimaginable aftershock of the Second World War the German philosopher Theodor W. Adorno made the famous statement, ‘To write poetry after Auschwitz is impossible.’  It was Nelly Sachs, more than anyone else, who showed that it was not only possible, it was necessary.

Child

Child

With the burial of your head

seed capsule of dreams

grown heavy

with endless resignation

ready now to sow in another country.

With eyes

turned round to mother earth –

– Child

 

The Berlin-born Jewish poet (1891-1970) was arrested and interrogated by the Gestapo in 1938,  and in 1940, after being summoned to report to a “work camp,” she narrowly escaped to the neutral country of Sweden with her mother. Throughout the war they lived in poverty, occupying a one-room apartment in Stockholm. Sachs penned poetry that bears witness to the Holocaust and the tragedy of the Jewish people with words that were also universal, symbolic of the suffering and redemption of all humanity.

Nelly Sachs 1966.jpg

On the day of her seventy-fifth birthday, Nelly Sachs was awarded the 1966 Nobel Prize in Literature. She gave the money away, half of it to the needy, half to the friend who had arranged to get her out of Germany in 1940.

 At her Nobel reception, Ingvar Andersson of the Swedish Academy made the following comments to her:

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