My Writing Space

I began the series on Writers’ Desks with my desk and am ending it (for now) by sharing with you my writing spaces.

First, I want to give a warm recognition to Eamonn McCabe for allowing me to use his photos of famous writers’ desks. Without his photos I never would have had this series. So, thank you Mr. McCabe.

I wish I still had the stories i wrote on my first typewriter.

Vintage Toy Typewriter (1950's)

I then graduated to my father’s Smith-Corona in my own Waldon’s Pond  cabinOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

I keep this photo on the wall of my office as a reminder that I have come a long way.

A poster of Virginia Woolf from a summer doing research in the Bloomsbury district of London, Virginia’s stomping ground.

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To remain open, a quote from E.M. Forster on my wall.

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Michael Frayn

“When I start I like to know in advance where the story is going, and I spend a lot of time thinking about the story before I begin writing it.” (Paris Review)

Michael Frayn writes: spy thrillers (A Landing on the Sun), historical fiction (Headlong), about the creative process (The Trick of it),  farces (Noises Off)    award-winning plays (Democracy)  and translations of Chekhov’s plays (The Cherry Orchard).

“I get more enjoyment out of rewriting, I think, than writing the original. The great difficulty is getting from nothing to something; going from something to something else is always easier.” (The Guardian).

Writers' rooms: Michael Frayn

Photgrapher: Eamonn McCabe

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Philip Hensher

 Here are some facts about Philip Hensher:

He was among Granta’s 20 Best of Young British Novelists in 2003.

His 2008 novel The Northern Clemency was shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize and the Commonwealth Prize.

His novel Scenes From Early Life (2012) is told in the form of a memoir and has photos in it.

He writes with no disturbances. No phone. No computer. No television.

Looking at the photograph of where Hensher writes, it’s obvious that he doesn’t have a desk.

In an interview with The Guardian Hensher said:

“I’ve never written successfully at a desk – whenever anyone tries to give me a desk, it always fills up immediately with old bits of paper, and, after a week or two, I go back to writing on the end of the dining table, clearing it all up before dinner. Or, more often, just on the arm of the sofa…A sofa, a notebook, and the promise to yourself that in a couple of hours you can put Radio 4 on – that’s just the ticket.”

 

Philip Hensher

Photographer: Eamonn McCabe

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Martin Amis

In doing this research on Martin Amis,  I learned that he normally spends two hours a day on his writing, five days a week. Except when he is in intensive editorial mode where he could spend 6 hours on his manuscript. I like this about Amis because it gives me hope regarding my own writing. Two hours a day seems to be my limit in working on my fiction. I usually work in the morning and then take  a break. I always tell myself that I’ll get back to my writing later in the afternoon. Sometimes I do, but most times – I don’t.

Amis is best known for his novels Money and London Fields which were published in the 80’s. Since then, he’s had published more than a dozen novels.

Suicide figures strongly in his novels, especially in Night Train (1998) a detective noir novel.

Night Train’ belongs to that special class of fiction, the literary genre novel. Amis takes the conventions of the crime genre, and more specifically the hardboiled noir genre; he plays with them, he turns them on their head, and he delivers as a result one of the most scintillating pieces of fiction in a generation.

http://www.medium.com/longform-literary-reviews/f5214cebd2a7

 

I once wrote a post In Praise of Messiness .  The odd thing is that I like a minimalist, clean look in every other room in my home but my office. Except for Mr. Amis furniture, I quite like his office. It has that messy , familiar feeling that I am comfortable with.

 

Martin Amis

Photographer: Eamonn McCabe

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Lord Byron

 I have great hopes that we shall love each other all our lives as much as if we had never married at all

Byron’s reputation as a womanizer is well-known. He was a  free-spirited man whose personal life was filled with scandalous, salacious affairs.

In a Slate article Katha Pollitt writes: In his short life (1788-1824), George Gordon, Lord Byron, managed to cram in just about every sort of connection imaginable—unrequited pinings galore; affairs with aristocrats, actresses, servants, landladies, worshipful fans, and more in almost as many countries as appear on Don Giovanni’s list; plus countless one-offs with prostitutes and purchased girls; a brief, disastrous marriage; and an incestuous relationship with his half-sister. And that’s just the women!

 Edna O’Brien‘s biography of Byron – aptly titled Byron in Love – reveals his multiple romantic and sexual relationships which nourished his poetry. 

 His masterpiece was his satirical epic poem Don Juan in which he reverses the roles of man as seducer to man being seduced by women. In this way, I think his Don Juan would make a great character in a Chandler, Hammett or Dorothy Hughes novel.

Lady Caroline Lamb, one of many of Byron’s lovers and a novelist herself, described Byron as being “mad, bad and dangerous to know.” A true Homme Fatale.   

Lord Byron

Photographer: Eamonn McCabe

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Marilyn Monroe

Photo: entertainment

The American playwright and Pulitzer Prize winner William Motter Inge, wrote Bus Stop. His works are known for solitary protagonists and strained sexual relationships, which is no surprise as he was mentored by Tennessee Williams.

Bus Stop was Marilyn’s first starring role in a dramatic film and her first movie made after studying at the Actor’s Studio in New York with Lee Strasberg. Her role in the movie transported her from bombshell to serious actress.

Her performance got the best reviews of her career and brought her an Oscar nomination for best actress.

While filming Bus Stop Marilyn stayed at the San Carlos Hotel in Phoenix, Arizona.

Photo

 – a hotel which attracted such stars as Clark Gable, Mae West, Carole Lombard, Ingrid Bergman, Spencer Tracey, Humphrey Bogart and Jean Harlow.

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   Marilyn insisted on staying in the suite on the third floor next to the pool so that she could tan while not working.

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I recently stayed at this hotel and visited her suite.

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As I did so, I imagined her sitting here writing some of her poetry.

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Russell Hoban

Russell Hoban (1925-2011) was an American novelist and children’s writer.

What makes Russell Hoban’s writing so memorable, and creates passionate devotees of those lucky enough to discover his work, is his patented blend of droll, arch humor mixed.  Dave Awl

For more details on arch humor click here.

Russell worked in a rambling (some might say chaotic) study which he called his “exobrain”, actually a large reception room at the front of the upper ground floor of his house in Fulham.  The Guardian

Writers' rooms: Russell Hoban

Photographer: Eamonn McCabe

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