LISTENING TO JEAN-MICHEL BLAIS AT THE MONTREAL JAZZ FESTIVAL

AUBADES

LISTENING TO JEAN – MICHEL BLAIS AT THE MONTREAL JAZZ FESTIVAL

There are words that I want to write about.

Kindness and joy and other words that fill a dictionary like sunrise and sunset. Words that wobble like a wild wobbling turkey and words that fill souls and warm hearts: Thank you. You are dazzling.

Words like imagination, inspiration and passion although passion can sometimes be a dangerous word that can lead to jealousy and murder and other words that I do not even want to think about.

I want to write about the beauty of an ocean and the rays of a sun shining on a seaway that will lead to that endless ocean.

I want to write words that smell like the apple pie which my father used to make.

Memories of wadding in a plastic pool with my sister and her white rubber bathing cap are also good words that make me feel that she is still with me.

Perfect is also a good word although I have found it hard to end my day without messing up one way or another like having a series of perfect golf shots only to end up on the green with three putts, if you know what I mean.

I want to write about naiveté and vulnerability and being humble.

Words that are unselfish. Everyday words that are too often unused like love and happiness and smiles.

Unpretentious, funny and confident. These are also good words to incorporate into one’s life.

Words that make you dream and hope and believe in faith and the goodness of mankind.

Youthfulness, appreciation and acceptance are also good to have swirling in one’s head.

Persistence, dedication and effort. Difficult words at times but necessary.

Rustling sounding words and murmurs of birds flying by.

Lightness and strength and desire. Good to carry around.

Words that say Hello, Good Morning, How Are You?

Words that are delicate, gentle and relaxing.

You think to yourself that this masquerade of happiness, joy, and spring is all very well, but occasionally you get tears in your eyes, and you realize that there’s maybe a small wound beneath the surface, an underlying sadness to it all, one that you nonetheless contemplate with optimism, with a willingness to turn it into something positive.” Jean-Michel Blais