Martin Amis

In doing this research on Martin Amis,  I learned that he normally spends two hours a day on his writing, five days a week. Except when he is in intensive editorial mode where he could spend 6 hours on his manuscript. I like this about Amis because it gives me hope regarding my own writing. Two hours a day seems to be my limit in working on my fiction. I usually work in the morning and then take  a break. I always tell myself that I’ll get back to my writing later in the afternoon. Sometimes I do, but most times – I don’t.

Amis is best known for his novels Money and London Fields which were published in the 80’s. Since then, he’s had published more than a dozen novels.

Suicide figures strongly in his novels, especially in Night Train (1998) a detective noir novel.

Night Train’ belongs to that special class of fiction, the literary genre novel. Amis takes the conventions of the crime genre, and more specifically the hardboiled noir genre; he plays with them, he turns them on their head, and he delivers as a result one of the most scintillating pieces of fiction in a generation.

http://www.medium.com/longform-literary-reviews/f5214cebd2a7

 

I once wrote a post In Praise of Messiness .  The odd thing is that I like a minimalist, clean look in every other room in my home but my office. Except for Mr. Amis furniture, I quite like his office. It has that messy , familiar feeling that I am comfortable with.

 

Martin Amis

Photographer: Eamonn McCabe

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Beryl Bainbridge

“Beryl Bainbridge has writers’ block. (You’d think, wouldn’t you, that after 17 novels she’d have got the hang of it?) The problem, it seems, has been the title. It has taken her two years to get it right. For a while it was called The Might Have Been: a perfectly good title; nicely intriguing, with a hint of her trademark wry humour. But she wasn’t happy with it. So the rest of the book had to wait until she was.” Debbie Taylor

 

Here are some titles of her novels 

The Girl with the Polka Dot Dress

The Dressmaker

An Awfully Big Adventure

Every Man for Himself 

A Quiet Life

A Weekend with Claude 

” I don’t mind working in a bit of clutter. It’s your mind that has to be clear.” 

Writers' rooms: Beryl Bainbridge

Photographer: Eamonn Mccabe


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Edna O’Brien

Oops! I accidentally clicked on my own like and apparently there’s no way to undo it…Sniff…sniff

Anyway…here’s the post.

“You have to be lonely to be  a writer,” says Edna O’Brien in an interview with  Jane Martinson of The Guardian regarding her recent memoir Country Girl“You wouldn’t go through the purgatory of writing unless you were a lonely person.”

Edna O’Brien published Country Girls (notice the difference from her memoir Country Girl) in 1930, which was banned in Ireland for its candid treatment of sex.

Author of The Sea, John Banville (2013)  writes in the introduction to her short stories The Love Object  “Here, as so often elsewhere, Edna O’Brien mourns for the plight of her wounded women and at the same celebrates their exuberance, their generosity, and ultimately, their indomitable spirit. She is, simply, one of the finest writers of our time.”

When I first laid eyes on her office a line from The Eagles’ Hotel California came to mind:

Such a lovely place

Edna O'Brien

Photographer: Eamonn McCabe 

Look, she even has a bouquet of fresh flowers.

Or maybe it was this quote of hers:

Writers really live in the mind and in hotels of the soul.

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